Ashleigh Paige

I'm a full-time college sophomore pursuing my B.A. in English with hopes of one day working as an editor. Cats, musicals, documentaries about cults/disasters/tragedies, and curse words are just a few of my favorite things. Also, check out our blog or I WILL FIND YOU.

Throne of Glass

The Assassin and the Princess - Sarah J. Maas Also appears on my blog, The YA Kitten! I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley.3.5 stars.And now the moment of truth: Throne of Glass itself. I went for the novellas first and after seeing those slowly decline in quality, I was worried the novel itself would share those flaws. I suppose I worried for nothing; Throne of Glass was the lengthier version of everything I wish the novellas could have been. I still had a few problems with it, but I'm hooked well enough to stay around.Maas writes a clear and very readable story with few to no narrative tripping points to knock me out of Celaena's world; it took me only two days to read the novel in its entirety. If it hadn't been for the pesky necessity known as sleep, I would have read it in one. About halfway through the novel, I exclaimed to myself, "Finally, someone gets that a woman can be a butt-kicker and still like clothes and jewelry and girly stuff!" Celaena was someone I loved reading about because of her bright yet hardened (though not as hardened as I expected, considering her backstory) personality and the challenges she faces.Celaena, Prince Dorian, Captain of the Guard Chaol Westfall, noblewoman Kaltain Rompier, and the king himself all take their turns as narrators and show the readers far more than just what's going on with the tournament. A secret scheme or two is hinted at and while they are not given much of a spotlight, there is the promise they will come to be very important. The grand mystery of this novel--who is killing the other potential champions?--may seem a bit obvious to some, but red herrings and small hints keep most readers guessing. Believe me, I was happy to see improvement in the author's ability to write a mystery. The second novella The Assassin and the Desert also had a mystery as its central plot and it was a poorly written one, in my opinion.When it comes to Celaena's clothes and how each of her two love interests feel about her (ah, love triangles: how I have not missed them), we get plenty of description. Concerning the all-important Tests that determine who stays in the competition and who gets knocked out, we get very little. I wanted to see more of the challenges Celaena had to go through. The focus on somewhat unnecessary details and the romance slowed down the pacing to the point where I had to force myself to keep reading until I hit a point where something of interest was finally happening.There will be two more books in this series at the very least and that means at least two more books for the explanation of Celaena's world, but I wanted to know a little more about the magic and the history of it in their world. In a scene at the beginning of the novel, Celaena wakes up in a tent to find small footprints leading in and out of the tent, along with flowers at the foot of her cot. This is promptly dropped and never brought up again. It may have been small, but I really wanted to know about it.My recommendation? Pick up the novel but think long and hard about whether or not you want to read the novellas. They're nothing compared to the book. As for me, I'll be patiently awaiting the second novel in the series so I can see where the scheme revealed at the end of the novel will go and what Celaena will do about it.(But I will continue to ignore its marketing as Game of Thrones for teens or, more specifically, teenage girls. I'll tell you what Game of Thrones for teenage girls is: Game of Thrones. It really gets my goat when the marketing for a novel stereotypes it to "_____ for teenage girls" because it stars a girl and there's more romance. That's kinda sexist, don't you think? I had this same problem with the way Starcrossed by Josephine Angelini was marketed as Percy Jackson for teenage girls. Last time I checked, Percy Jackson for teenage girls was Percy Jackson.)